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Juneau Ice Field Taku Towers, Alaska © Keith Daellenbach
Federation of Western Outdoor Clubs







    
As the American frontier closed in the late 19th century, people throughout the west began to gather in local outdoor clubs. They sought to enjoy nature rather to exploit it. They longed for a different relationship to the land — one of respect that was rooted in a new ethic.

As their numbers grew, they felt the need to cooperate and coordinate their work to preserve and enjoy nature. In 1932, they banded together to form the Federation of Western Outdoor Clubs. It has carried this work forward ever since, representing nearly four dozen clubs in eight states.


Through the years, the Federation has helped expand our systems to protect nature. Its agents and members helped secure passage of the Wilderness Act. They made important contributions to the establishment of the North Cascades National Park and to the establishment of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in Washington state, as well as to the establishment of various wilderness areas in the national forests of Oregon and California.  In recent years, it lent its help to the establishment of a national monument in the Sierra Nevada Range to protect the remainder of the Giant Sequoias.

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